Research Institute Publishes Trove of Facts About Education

by: 

Staff
Dec 16, 2015
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Just Facts, a non-profit research institute, has published a comprehensive resource of objective and thoroughly documented facts about education.

This research contains hundreds of vital facts about the tangible outcomes and costs of preschool, K-12 education, higher education, and initiatives like Common Core, school choice, and digital learning.

With 750 footnotes backed by highly credible primary sources, this resource provides parents, students, educators, voters, and policymakers with reliable facts that are essential to making informed decisions about these important matters.

A small sampling of facts from this research includes the following:

Only 46% of U.S. adults are able to correctly answer a question requiring the ability to search text, interpret it, and calculate using multiplication.

The average cost to educate a classroom of public school students is $283,000 per year.

In international tests administered to students in dozens of nations, U.S. fourth graders rank in the top 15% of nations for reading and math. By the age of 15, U.S. students drop to 50% in reading and to the bottom 25% in math.

Government spending on higher education amounts to 85% of all spending by colleges on functions that directly contribute to the education of students and the general public.

Among students who graduate from a 4-year college, roughly one-third do not improve their "critical thinking, complex reasoning, and writing skills."

On non-holiday weekdays during the school year, full-time college students spend about half as much time on educational activities as high school students.

Between 1960 and 2013, the portion of 3-to-4 year-olds in government-run education programs increased from 9% to 31%.

At least 21 high-quality studies have been conducted on the academic outcomes of students who remain in public schools that are subject to school choice programs. All but one of the studies found neutral-to-positive results on certain groups of students. None of the studies found negative results.

The full research is available at www.justfacts.com/education.asp

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